The End of the Beginning- We Made It!

 

Wow wow wowie wow! We finished the trail!! After walking 2,660.1 miles in just a day under five months all of a sudden we found ourselves crossing the Canadian border on Monday morning. What a huge adventure and experience it has been! I remember starting the trail way back in April and Luke telling me that by the time we got to Washington it would be a “victory lap” and that we would “fly right through it.”

Yoga at the Monument!

Yoga at the Monument!

It turns out, Washington was one of the most challenging sections of the trail- we faced washed out trail sections, huge downed trees, giant climbs, exposed ridge walking, tough rocky trails, frozen fingers & toes, much more rain than we were prepared for and snow! We also got to walk on top of beautiful ridges, enjoy some gloriously sunny days, look out over huge views, work our bodies hard, eat a whole bunch of extra treats to stay warm and just enjoy the heck out of the trail!

We left Skykomish/Steven’s Pass with 180 miles standing between us and the end of the trail. We had heard rumors that it would be raining for the whole 100 miles to Stehekin (our last trail town) but we left town in high spirits. We had a gorgeous sunny afternoon to hike out and had thoroughly enjoyed resting at the Dinsomore’s Hiker Haven- they were the last established trail angels on trail.

Great trail angels at a much needed rest spot!

Great trail angels at a much needed rest spot!

We hiked around 9 miles out that afternoon and camped at a  lake with two section hikers. We woke up to an amazing sunrise with plans to do a bunch of miles to take advantage of the sunny day. We hiked into the Glacier Peak Wilderness and had our first views of Glacier Peak and the surrounding mountains. The mountains were sharp, rugged and cliffy ahead of us and we spent most of the day climbing up and down onto exposed ridges. Luckily the rain held off just about until we arrived at camp. As we hiked our last miles of the days fog and clouds began to rise up over the ridge we were walking on and down into the valley. When we arrived at camp we were surrounded in a misty foggy cloud and shortly after we finished dinner the rain began. We also ran into our friend Rabbit Stick that night and he gave us a HUGE bag of huckleberries that we ate by the spoonful!

Sunrise

Sunrise

Hiking!

Almost at our breakfast spot for the day!

20130925-125400.jpg

Glacier Peak

PCT

PCT

One of the many mountain lakes

One of the many mountain lakes

Views!

Views and sunshine make for happy hikers!

20130925-125440.jpg

Another pristine lake

Clouds starting to build

Clouds starting to build

And the fog starts to come in

And the fog starts to come in…

Almost to camp and surrounded by the mist and fog

Almost to camp and surrounded by the mist and fog

The next few days we were in a perpetual cloud..just like this.

The next few days we were in a perpetual cloud..just like this.

The next few days we were hiking in mist that would gradually turn into rain and then back to mist and clouds. We also had quite a few large and icy riving crossings to do. One of the themes of this area seemed to be bridges that were washed out, broken or made of giant blow-downs. There was also a brand new bridge built that added 5 miles to the trail- but we were so glad to have it there! This section also took us through an amazing old growth tree grove where some of the trees were over 500 or 600 years old. There were also numerous trees across the trail that we would go over, under and around. I had one of my coldest mornings on the trail in this section – we started early to catch the 3pm bus from the trail to Stehekin (our last trail town). We were hiking in the icy rain and through a trail that was at times more stream than trail. My toes rapidly went numb and we hiked as fast as we could in order to stay warm and to do 22 miles before 3pm in order to make the bus. We hiked fast (and at times ran) these 22 miles and we made it to the bus to Stehekin with just 10 minutes to spare and with a rain free afternoon! We headed into Stekehin for an afternoon of rest and what turned out to be a much needed and fun zero day.

20130925-131647.jpg

Huge washout

One of the many "bridges" we crossed

One of the many “bridges” we crossed

Broken bridge

Broken bridge

The rainy weather made for a very green and lush forest to hike through.

The rainy weather made for a very green and lush forest to hike through.

Old growth trees

Old growth trees

Cold morning views

Cold morning views

Glacial river

Glacial river

Trees down

Trees down

Watefall

Watefall

20130925-131732.jpg

Stream or trail?

North Cascades National Park!

North Cascades National Park!

We made it to High Bridge with 10 minutes to spare!

We made it to High Bridge with 10 minutes to spare!

This river flows into Lake Chelan- a 40ish mile long lake that the "town" of Stehekin is located on.

This river flows into Lake Chelan- a 40ish mile long lake that the “town” of Stehekin is located on.

Stehekin- According to trail legend Billy Goat- is the Best place in America. We found it hard to disagree. There really isn’t very much there, and I can’t imagine that there are more than 100 full time residents. A post office, resort, and an absolutely phenomenal bakery is really all there is. Though there is a road that runs through town, it doesn’t lead anywhere- the road runs the length of the valley, bordered on one side by high mountains and the other by the long Lake Chelan. Lake Chelan is a beautiful blue-green lake fed by glacial meltwater. In our day and a half in Stehekin, we visited the Bakery 3 times, spent two wonderful nights with friends by the lake, and soaked up some much needed sun. By the following morning, when it was time to leave, we felt ready to set out for the last 80 miles, and the few days of rain we knew were in the forecast.

Instigate soaking it all in

Instigate soaking it all in

Kale and Whiskey in Stehekin- what else?

Kale and Whiskey in Stehekin- what else?

20130924-160238.jpg

Left to Right-
Scrub, Instigate, Carrot (back row), Lotus, Hermes, Spark, Blur, Robin Hood, Tallywa, Samba, Jackrabbit, Rabbit Stick

Hiker boxes in Stehekin, the last trail town

Hiker boxes in Stehekin, the last trail town

Leaving Stehekin the trail follows valleys up to 6000 and 7000 feet, where it stays virtually until the end. The first day out we had great weather, and could really feel the cool fall air. Of the seasonal foliage that there was in the mostly evergreen forests, much was changing in to its fall colors. A great group of people hiked out of Stehekin at the same time as us, and everyone from this group finished the same day as us. Our first night out it rained overnight, and we had a few showers the next morning, but the rain unexpectedly held off for most of the first day, giving one last great day of hiking. Of course, this pattern did not hold, and by the following morning, until after we finished, there was some form of precipitation coming down from the sky. Our second day out of Stehekin we got some amazing trail magic at Harts Pass, just 30 miles from the Canadian Border. We had hiked 27 miles to get there knowing that in case it was pouring we could always sleep in the pit toilets there- fortunately it stayed dry enough that we were warm and happy sleeping in our tent. We also managed to avoid any unexpected stays in the pit toilet bathrooms- some hikers weren’t quite as lucky though. Serpent Slayer and Slick B. proved to be an amazing trail angel duo, and they kept the fire, food and music going until hiker midnight- these days sometime around 9:00 PM.The next morning , fueled by pancakes and hot coffee we headed out in to another day of rain, but the knowledge that it was our last full day kept us going strong and happy! Recent washouts the size of swimming pools slowed us slightly, but they weren’t quite as bad as the trail rumors purported them to be- check out photos below. It began to snow on us towards the end of the day- by the following morning we woke up in 5 inches of snow! The snow made it a little bit harder to get out of the tent, but Blur and Goodall left around 7 AM and that motivated us to get up and going.

The trail in Washington is... tough

The trail in Washington is… tough

2601 miles!

2601 miles!

Scrub on a big climb

Scrub on a big climb

Beautiful

Beautiful

Sub- Alpine Larch

Sub- Alpine Larch

Unexpected sunny weather!

Trail Magic!

Trail Magic!

Scrub soaking it all in

Scrub soaking it all in

On our last day, after two totally surreal hours of hiking (and 5 months of hiking before it), we hit the Canadian Border. Both of us had always imagined this to be the climactic moment for the end of the trip, but on arrival, it felt a little subdued, knowing there were still 8 miles left until we got to the road. We finished with Jackrabbit, Instigate, Spark, and Scrub. Cookie, Blur, and Goodall finished an hour ahead of us, and Carrot, Robin Hood, Samba and Tallywa finished a few hours after us. The real moment when it felt like the trail ended was when-… well it was when the trail ended- it hit a road that it did not cross. We arrived at Manning Park Resort, and sat around, warming up with friends and relishing in that moment. It was blissful.

We woke up to 5 inches of snow around our tent on the last day!

We woke up to 5 inches of snow around our tent on the last day!

Snowy Trail!

Snowy Trail!

2,660.1 miles

2,660.1 miles

Yoga at the Monument!

Yoga at the Monument!

The monument

The monument

The literal end of the trail at the road...

The literal end of the trail at the road…

Manning Park- no more walking

Manning Park- no more walking

Staying warm after a five month hike.

Staying warm after a five month hike.

So- what’s next? For now we are in Bellingham staying with Luke’s friend Ben and having an amazing time. Next up is Seattle and then Portland and then San Francisco. After we take a few days to rest and re-acclimate to the world we will have some post trip reflections, gear reviews and some additional photos up on the blog. Until then- thanks to everyone who has supported us throughout this hike! Family, friends, sponsors, strangers who became friends, complete strangers and others have been so nice and generous and excited to help us finish this hike- THANK YOU!

Advertisements

Mountains Beyond Mountains

What does it take to make an entire group of PCT thru-hikers sleep like a rock, wake up late, and bonk after 10 miles the next day? Simply put – Washington. Though we’ve had quite a few tough areas on this trail, Washington seems to be the kicker at the end. The biggest day we’ve had recently- 28 miles, and 8000 ft. of climbing, in hot, exposed alpine areas wore us out.  Of course, none of this is without reward. We’re continually bombarded with beautiful alpine passes, and views that are only hindered by towering rock spires and glaciated peaks. Friday, we saw for the first time Glacier Peak and Mt. Baker, the last of the Cascade Volcanoes. Cold, stunningly clear streams feed into equally cold, blue-green alpine lakes, carving steep canyons through the eroding mountainsides. Forested mountain slopes can rise 2000 vertical feet for every lateral mile, making the peaks look more like a vertical, cresting wave than a stationary rock.

Needless to say Lotus and I have been  pooped. The long flat days in Oregon are certainly over, and hiking is more akin to the High Sierra than anything else. Leaving White Pass we were inundated in a true Northwest rainstorm. After sitting out overnight thunderstorms in a Packwood, WA Hotel, we knowingly walked out in to a full day and night of cold rain. It was a damp night without a doubt. The next morning, with almost everything soaked through (save the sleeping bags- bone dry!) we woke up to cold clear sunny weather. Of course, the weather clouded over by 10 AM, and we walked all that day in the cold, with intermittent light rain. Our morale was pretty high, knowing good weather was on the way, and it was gorgeous to see that area what might be its natural state- cloudy. We were lucky enough to hike most days in this section with Blur and Goodall, though we unfortunately left them behind in Snoqualmie Pass, as they spent the night resting up.

Arriving in Snoqualmie pass, we knew we were in for some amazing and difficult hiking. For a day and a half, we had been seeing 8000 ft. peaks in the distance to the North. In the pass, the first of these peaks rises up 3000 feet- right in the path of the trail. This was the first of many of these giant climbs. The heat wave Western Washington is in right now isn’t helping. Our mantra has been “The heat is better than the rain,” and its true- Lotus and I would both rather be in the heat for the rest of the way than in the rain. Unfortunately, it wasn’t meant to be, and now there is rain in the forecast.  We’ve been hiking around several friends from far earlier in the trail- Robin Hood, Blur, Goodall, and Dinnertime. Additionally, we’ve enjoyed hiking around Spark, Instigate, Carrot, and Jack Rabbit.

As you might have presumed, we’ve only got about 9 days left on the trail. Canada is 184 miles away. We are both excited, terrified, happy, sad, confident, proud, and unsure. As on the Appalachian Trail, the end has crept up faster than I’m ready for. The journey is only half over at the Canadian Border. Adapting back to the front-country world is a challenge on its own. Finding our way back to a job (Anyone want to hire us?), back to the things that string our happiness along, back to a (at least somewhat) regular schedule. I won’t get too sentimental yet, but these things are all on our minds.

Extra Special Thanks to Becca and Emma for sending us some fine care packages- they were both so welcome!

Unfortunately, we can’t get any photos up for this blog entry, but we’ll get them to you as soon as we can!

This is likely going to be our last blog post until the end of the trail! 184 miles to the end. We’ll see you on the other side!

Sunlight Solar!

20130815-173114.jpg

Luke with our new Solar Charger!

We’re happy to announce a new sponsor of ours- Sunlight Solar Energy! They were nice enough to give us a small solar charger/ backup battery, made by Sunpower. Thanks for the generous sponsorship!

Logo white

Sunlight Solar sells complete Solar Photovoltaic energy systems, both residential and commercial. Their service territory is Oregon & Washington, as well as Southern New England! If you’re interested in going solar, definitely check them out!

20130815-173121.jpg

Soaking up the Sun(power)!

500 miles: Big Days, Big Wind & Big Desert

Well we did it- we passed the 500 mile mark! Hooray! Oh wait- we still have 2160 miles to go! We are currently in Tehachapi and we have just passed over 550 miles hiked and are still having an amazing time. Hermes and I left Agua Dulce a few days ago with the intention of “maybe” stopping at The Andersons, or Casa de Luna. The Andersons are amazing trail angels located just 24 miles from the Saufleys (where we took our first zero day), and there is a reputation of it being a big non stop party. We were a little wary of this because after all of the fun we had at the Saufley’s we were ready for a good night of sleep. Our friend, Yusuke, caught up with us just as we arrived at the trail head and after a short time of trying for a hitch we were picked up by a woman and her sleeping baby and immediately shuttled off to the Andersons.

Waiting for a hitch to the Andersons.

Waiting for a hitch to the Andersons.

Although it was definitely a party scene it was also a blast. Terrie served up a huge round of taco salad and we caught up with a bunch of people we hadn’t seen in a few days and met some new hikers. We headed off to bed early, ready to leave and hike the next morning….but that didn’t happen! The next day started off with pancakes and coffee and after Hermes ate five pancakes we looked at each other and decided to go find somewhere to set our tent back up.

Tent sites in the manzanillo forest behind Casa de Luna

Tent sites in the manzanillo forest behind Casa de Luna

We took our second zero at the Anderson’s and had a great time hanging out, doing some yoga, resting up and we were even treated to a cello concert that evening by Cuddles– “possibly the foremost cello playing thru hiker on the PCT.”

Hanging out at Casa de Luna

Hanging out at Casa de Luna

We left the Anderson’s the next morning on May 24th- our one month Trailversary! We headed out with our friend Chad, or Happy Feet/iChad/Chadderz, who we left Kick Off with on our first night hike almost a month before. We planned to try and push the 40 miles from the Anderons all the way to Hikertown. We had a full moon that night, and although we didn’t leave the Andersons until after 9 am that day, we thought we could do it. We started the hike with a climb, and then kept climbing slowly up for most of the day. Around dinner time the three of us stopped on the side of the trail to cook dinner and shortly we were joined by Hummingbird and Wildcat. 

20130527-182121.jpg

After dinner we made it past the 500 mile mark (!) and kept on going.

500 miles in!!

500 miles in!!

 We reached the top of a ridge as the sun was setting and the moon made it’s appearance behind us. We were treated to a gorgeous view of sunset and moonrise at the same time. We didn’t make it the full 40 miles to Hikertown, but we did manage to do our first 30 mile day, which left us an easy 10 miles into Hikertown the next morning.

Moonrise!

Moonrise!

Hikertown is full of old movie set discards and is set up to look like an old western style town. We hung out for the heat of the day before heading off to hike the 30ish mile section that is the official Mojave Desert.

Hikertown! So sad that we missed our care package there!

Hikertown! So sad that we missed our care package there!

The first 16 miles or so is along the LA Aquaduct..some of which is open water, other parts are a giant black metal pipe, and the majority is buried underground and covered over with smooth concrete. It was straight, flat and easy walking especially in the cool of the evening and the lower than average temperatures we had for that section.

LA Aquaduct

LA Aquaduct

A few miles into our hike we were met by Cartwheel, a PCT hiker who was taking time off to be in a friends wedding and trail angeling in his down time. Cartwheel fed us watermelon, ice cold beers and gave us chairs to sit while we enjoyed his generosity. Awesome trail angel!

Watermelon & Beer!

Watermelon & Beer!

Thanks Cartwheel!

Thanks Cartwheel!

Leaving Hikertown, we planned to hike 10 or so miles, but six miles in we were pooped. The 30 miler the day before had left me exhausted. We called it a day with a total of 16 miles and went to sleep ready to finish the aquaduct and desert section early the next morning.

Over the next day and a half we walked through huge numbers of wind turbines, which were beautiful to look at from afar. But it turns out that these wind turbines were sited perfectly- the wind didn’t stop as we walked through these fields of turbines.

Turbines!

Turbines!

We seemed to have a constant wind of 30ish mph with gusts up to 65mph. I was getting tossed around on the trail and we made some slow time through there. At one point, Hermes turned to me and said he could understand why Don Quixote had gone crazy with all of the windmills. We kept pushing on though, knowing that Tehachapi wasn’t far and that when we got there we would be visiting Blue Ginger Pho for Vietnamese food!!

Once we arrived at the trail head to hitch in Tehachapi, we were instantly greated by a trail angel dropping three hikers off and who offered us a ride into Tehachapi. We were dropped off in Tehachapi in front of two Best Westerns and a Fairfield Inn. We knew this would be our last chance for a hotel like this for many miles and had decided we would stay at the cheapest of the three. Shortly after calling my mom for her help checking rates at the Fairfield, she had booked us a room using her Marriot points. WOW! We have so enjoyed our clean, comfortable and quiet room- thank you Mom!!

After checking in we got a quick hitch over Blue Ginger Pho and enjoyed an amazing and vegan town meal! So far I have been eating veggie burgers and fries, but this time I was able to eat as much Vietnamese food as I could. Tehachapi is definitely a vegan friendly town. We had no trouble resupplying hear and found some great dinners to take out on the trail!

We had a huge contintental breakfast this morning and are currently looking outside at a rain and cloud filled day with a high wind warning. We plan to hit the trail tonight because as unpleasant as rain and wind seems, the temperature is still below 70 and it will be a treat to not hike this section in the 90+ heat that is normal for this time of year.

Two notes- please email us if you do send a care package, we very sadly missed one in Hikertown. Second- the pictures below are all out of order and I had a hard time captioning  them with the hotel computers..sorry about that!

20130527-181734.jpg

Our huge lunch at Blue Ginger Pho in Tehachapi!

20130527-181740.jpg

20130527-181812.jpg

More turbines…

20130527-181817.jpg

More turbines.

20130527-181822.jpg

Moon view.

20130527-181827.jpg

Wind turbines in the distance.

20130527-181832.jpg

Incredibly windy section full of wind farms.

20130527-181837.jpg

20130527-181842.jpg

The desert.

20130527-181847.jpg

20130527-181852.jpg

Orange moon rise in the Mojave.

20130527-181857.jpg

Desert walking…

20130527-181902.jpg

Joshua Trees.

20130527-181910.jpg

Aquaduct.

20130527-181940.jpg

Walking on the closed aquaduct.

20130527-181946.jpg

Updog.

20130527-181953.jpg

Downdog.

20130527-181959.jpg

The first portion of the LA Aquaduct..open water in the middle of the Mojave Desert.

20130527-182022.jpg

Oh..good!

20130527-182032.jpg

20130527-182041.jpg

Moonrise!

20130527-182050.jpg

Moonrise

20130527-182058.jpg

20130527-182105.jpg

The official PCT 500 mile marker- actually at mile 502..

20130527-182130.jpg

Break time!

20130527-182137.jpg

Trailside cave

20130527-182145.jpg

Phat-man-do arriving in full hiking gear…his neighbor was the person that Crocodile Dundee is based on!

20130527-182156.jpg

Wheelbarrow full of beer courtesy of Casa de Luna.

20130527-182230.jpg

Care package from Keen! Thank you!!!

20130527-182240.jpg

The So-Cal Desert

With Kickoff a few days past, and some a few miles on our legs, we’re posted up in Warner Springs, a small town with a Post Office and community center, free ranging cows, and not too much else. We’re taking the morning off, letting our

20130501-100247.jpg

Becky Celebrating 100 miles on the trail! (she had a hard time standing up after crouching for this shot…)

bodies and minds rest for a bit- 80 +  miles in the last four days definitely left us hungry, dirty, and tired.

Interior Southern California has been a total adventure- all new terrain for me, and reminiscent of Becky’s time in Baja with NOLS. The landscape changes constantly from ridge to ridge. Up in the Mount Laguna area, we hiked through tall pine forests, only to pass through very arid burn-scapes fifteen miles later. Eastern mountains are clearly stuck in the

20130501-100136.jpgrain shadow of the western peaks- Often the next ridge over may be forested, when we are hiking through cacti.

Probably the most amazing feature I didn’t expect has been the desert bloom. It’s springtime here, and though that doesn’t mean quite the same thing as it does in Vermont, it is gorgeous. It has been a reasonably dry winter here in SoCal, below average rainfall- but that hasn’t stopped many of the cacti and wildflowers from blooming. See below for pictures!

From here, its 4 days to Idyllwild, 75 miles away. After that comes Mount San Jacinto, the tallest peak in Southern California, around 10,000 ft. Its a 3-4 mile spur trail- miles that don’t count towards the PCT, but we may not be able to resist the temptation to do a little peak-bagging, especially if some snow remains on the top! There is a lot to be excited about, here we go!

20130501-095956.jpg

Day Four!

20130501-100008.jpg

Yoga

20130501-100016.jpg

Day Five!

20130501-100026.jpg

Mr. Grumpy

20130501-100033.jpg

20130501-100040.jpg

20130501-100102.jpg

Putting Our feet up during a mid-day break- staying cool and healthy.

20130501-100108.jpg

Not sure what this was doing there…

20130501-100115.jpg

20130501-100129.jpg

20130501-100143.jpg

Day Six!

20130501-100150.jpg

Road Runner!

20130501-100156.jpg

Prickly Pear

20130501-100202.jpg

High Seven!

20130501-100216.jpg

20130501-100221.jpg

California Poppy

20130501-100227.jpg

Yoga under the bridge

20130501-100234.jpg

20130501-100240.jpg

The San-Felipe Hills- dry as a bone.

20130501-100254.jpg

Eagle pose at Eagle Rock!

20130501-100300.jpg

Eagle pose at Eagle Rock!

20130501-100306.jpg

Vegan Dinner from ‘Monty Tam’ in Warner Springs- YES!

20130501-100315.jpg

Excited (the first of two plates of food)

20130501-100321.jpg

The crowd at Monty’s

photo (1)

Yucca

20130501-100349.jpg

20130501-100356.jpg

20130501-100408.jpg

21 Days to the trail!

21 Days to the trail!

Woohoo!! There are only three weeks until Luke and I head out on the trail! In just 21 days we will be arriving at Campo, CA and starting our hike. Everyday we are getting a little bit closer to actually being ready to go and I have finally realized that no matter how much we plan or don’t plan the trip is going to happen and we are going to be fine. We will have enough food, and if we don’t- we’ll buy more. Our gear will be fine, and if it’s not- we’ll swap it out for different gear. No matter how much we plan, the unexpected will happen and our plans will change and I am excited to see what the trail throws at us.

Last night we did a massive Costco run to get our snacks, breakfasts, and other assorted critical foods…like Nutella.

A full cart at Costco!

A full cart at Costco!

While we were there, we ran into another person from Burlington who will be thru hiking the PCT this year as well..Noah! Check out his blog here. He had a cart full of food and we compared purchases and food ideas. I serendipitously met Noah while at Outdoor Gear Exchange this weekend when I was buying new shoes to start in. Noah was talking to Shivers, an OGE employee and PCT thru hiker of 2012, when I walked up to find out if Shivers had any thoughts on my footwear choice. It turns out, Noah will be starting the PCT the day after Luke and I do. We are excited to have another person from Burlington out on the trail and we are getting together tonight to talk PCT planning.

Luke and I have also been able to take quite a few things off of our giant post it to do list in his (now our!) room. 

Checking things off!

Checking things off!

Last weekend, I graduated from my 200 hour yoga teacher training at Yoga Vermont, which was very bittersweet for me. I am so excited to get out on the trail but will really miss my yoga community here in Burlington. We also packed up my room at my apartment and put a bunch of things into temporary storage and squeezed my remaining things into Luke’s room for the next couple of weeks. It’s amazing how all of the things I need for the next 5+ months will fit in one pack and then how much space all the stuff I think I need for the next three weeks takes up.

One of my favorite post it's to take down!

One of my favorite post it’s to take down!

We are still running the dehydrator, but we only have a few nights of food left to do. Next, we have to finish purchasing our food,  portion out our meals and snacks and then somehow figure out how much and what to put into each of our resupply packages. In between all of this, we are trying to spend as much time as we can with our friends in Burlington and going to all of our favorite places. I had a great bike ride this weekend out to the causeway on Lake Champlain..this is one of my favorite places on the lake. I am striving  to embody the principles of Ryan Hawks during these last couple of weeks in Burlington, especially to “live everyday, all day” before we leave.

The Causeway stretching out on Lake Champlain

The Causeway stretching out on Lake Champlain

One more thing I want to share is that I will be teaching a Sunset/Moon Rise yoga class on the lake at the Annual Day Zero Pacific Crest Trail Kick Off (ADZPCTKO). I’m looking forward to sharing my yoga practice with the thru hiker community. I will be sharing a few ideas on how to keep your body feeling good through yoga while you hike and how to bring your yoga practice outside and into the world.

Join me at Sunset/Moonrise Yoga at ADZPCTKO!

Join me at Sunset/Moonrise Yoga at ADZPCTKO!